Writer Tips

The Football Faithful aims to bring only the highest quality articles to our readers, and with this in mind, here are a set of guidelines for you. If you stick to all of these, your writing will be of the highest quality.

NAMES

When you first mention a player, manager, team, person or stadium, always write out the full name.

Example: Manchester United’s strong start to the new campaign is a testament to Jose Mourinho’s decision to bring in Romelu Lukaku from Everton.

Not: Man Utd’s strong start to the new campaign is a testament to Mourinho’s decision to bring in Lukaku from Everton.

On second mention, you are free to state just the surname or abbreviated stadium name – i.e the Emirates rather than Emirates Stadium again.

NEVER write solely a person’s christian name – you don’t know them and you aren’t on first-name terms.

 

COMPETITIONS

Always give a competition its full name, but do not use sponsorship terms in the title.

YES – Premier League, League Cup, La Liga, Copa del Rey
NO – Premiership, Carabao Cup, Spanish league, Spanish cup

 

QUOTES

When using a quote from someone, it should be introduced in the sentence beforehand, it should be its own sentence and it should be opened and closed correctly.

Example:

Ronald Koeman praised Everton summer signing Ashley Williams after the game, stating the former Swansea centre-half’s addition was a boost for the Merseyside outfit’s rearguard:

“Ashley has come in and done really well,” the Toffees boss told Sky Sports.

“His addition has nullified the sale of John Stones.”

Please note that commas and full-stops are inside the quotation marks.

 

CAPITAL LETTERS

The name of a person, competition, team or stadium should be capitalised.

YES – Premier League, Alan Shearer, Tottenham Hotspur, Red Devils

A position should not.

YES – manager, coach, director of football
NO – Manager, Coach

 

NUMBERS

The numbers 1-9 should be written as words. Anything higher is as a number.

YES – Salah netted two goals, Bilic opted for three at the back, around 250 supporters stormed the pitch.

Circumstances when this changes:

• A monetary amount – £7 million
• When a number starts a sentence – “Twenty teams are in Premier League action…” Not “20 teams are in…
• Scorelines – 3-2

 

CURRENCY

• Use currency symbols, don’t write it out. £7 million not seven million pounds.
• When writing the first instance of a currency, write out million, billion etc. On second introduction it can be abbreviated to m, bn. £7 million first time, £7m second time.
• If using foreign currency, it is best to use pounds in brackets. Tottenham sign Messi for €100 million (£89 million)
• For headlines, figures must always be in pounds, not euros or other currencies.

 

 

REPETITION

Never have the same word in a sentence twice.

YES – Hazard scored at the end of the first half, before netting again in the 54th minute.
NO – Hazard scored in the 43rd minute and also scored in the 54th minute.

 

Never have the name of a player or team in consecutive sentences.

YES – Liverpool’s strong start to the new campaign is a testament to Jurgen Klopp’s ability to keep Philippe Coutinho at Anfield.

The Brazilian midfielder scored a quick-fire brace against Chelsea on Monday night, much to the German manager’s delight.

NO – Liverpool’s strong start to the new campaign is a testament to Jurgen Klopp’s ability to keep Philippe Coutinho at Anfield.

Coutinho scored a quick-fire brace against Chelsea on Monday night, much to the delight of Jurgen Klopp.

 

SOURCING

This is important. If using a quote or writing about a transfer rumour, please include the original source of that quote or the transfer rumour.

EXAMPLE: “Ashley has come in and done really well,” the Toffees boss told Sky Sports. (include hyperlink to online article where it has been said)

If you read the same comment on The Sun’s website, linking to the The Sun is not good enough because Koeman told Sky Sports. Needs to be the original source.

 

RUMOUR EXAMPLE:

Tottenham Hotspur are ready to launch a sensational £100 million bid for Lionel Messi, according to BBC Sport. (include hyperlink to online article)

If you read the same rumour republished in The Mirror, you can’t link to The Mirror – it has to be the first people who made the claim – BBC Sport. This is the same with foreign sources such as Marca, A Bola etc – link to the foreign webpage, not the rehashed English one.

• With all sources, please write them in italics – The Sun, not The Sun
• The only exception is a club’s official website – he told the club’s official website, not he told the club’s official website.

 

POSITIONS AND THE USE OF HYPHENS

Here are a list of positions and how they are written.

YES – Goalkeeper, right-back, left-back, centre-half, centre-back, central defender, central midfielder, centre forward, left winger.
NO – right back, centre half, central-midfielder, centre-forward

YES – Half-time, team-mate, quarter-final
NO – Half time, teammate, team mate, quarterfinal, quarter final

 

With the use of hyphens, if a two-word phrase describing something is coined, a hyphen is appropriate.

YES – two-word phrase, much-needed goal, last-gasp winner, deep-lying playmaker
NO – two word phrase, much needed goal, last-gasp-winner

 

The only exception to this is when the first word ends in the letter ‘y’ – then there is no hyphen.

YES – clearly motivated team, initially nervous defender, truly awful Arsenal
NO – clearly-motivated team, initially-nervous defender.

 

YES – 23-year-old,

NO – 23 year old.

Example – The 23-year-old signed a five-and-a-half year contract

 

YES – 23 years old

NO – 23-years-old.

Example – Lukaku is 23 years old and showing the signs he can be…..

 

USE ENGLISH NOT AMERICAN

• We don’t use foreign symbols, so it is Joachim Low not Joachim Löw.
• We use British English, not American English – Example – centre forward, not center forward

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